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or saving money. in the berlin crisis and earlier crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953 over the strait in 1954-55 and 1958 in the suez crisis in 1956, he was planning a bigger gain for higher stakes. west point cadet and young army officer, ike was a great poker player, and, indeed, so good, he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from the fellow officers hurting his career. he switched to bridge, but he never forgot how to bluff. the soviets, he bluffed with nuclear weapons. as only a real warrior can, ike hated war. curiously, the great war hero was never in combat. in world war i, he was training troops to his great chagrin, and world war ii, he was too valuable and knew too much to risk getting captured or killed, but he knew war. he went to battlefield when they smelled and saw the carnage. he followed the paths of the german and russian armies seeing not a single building left standing. he went to the concentration camps with the tough general pat ton who vomited when they saw what they found there. he was changed when he came home. he was not religious, but he was mor
 in pre-modern asian history. mostly i concentrate on thailand and vietnam. >> why is it important for students to the south asian history? >> it's very much engaged in that corner of the world we have many allies and partners that we are still working with come and many students at the naval officers southeast they are going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know south east asian history to be comfortable with someand to have knowledge of their history. >> well, professor ruth, one of our longtime allies is thailand, yet you have written a book called in buddhist company. thai soldiers in the vietnam wa did the military the vietnam war??o?g? >> was actually a close ally in the united states during the war.am people familiar with theg=o=o circumstances of the war will only did thailand fights to the united states and the other forces, but thailand erved as the basis for many of the aircraft that were bombin
in premodern asian history. mostly thailand and vietnam. >> why it's important to know the history? >> are suffering much engaged in the history of the world. we have many allies there, many partners we still work with and many students at the naval academy who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with cultures and have some knowledge of their history. >> professor ruth, one of our long-time allies is thailand. you've written a book called into this company. what role does the military play? >> thailand was very close ally during the vietnam war that many people who are familiar to know that not only did thailand send troops to fight alongside the united states, but thailand also served as the base for many aircraft were flying bombing missions over the ho chi minh trail, over laos, south vietnam and at the time we had looked seven airbases and develop a port there as well to facilitate the u.s. effort in the vietnam war and know so many american soldiers went to bangkok and sp
's most recent book is "wandering souls: journeys with the dead and the living in vietnam." professor, swhofs homer? >> he was a friend of mine who presently retired living in north carolina. he was a office platoon leader and company commander in the sam war. and he had contacted me a number of years ago because i had some contacts in vietnam vietnamese i had been working with. he had taken documents and a book from the body of an north vietnamese soldier he killed during the war, and wanted to see if he could find a family and return the documents to them. >> why? >> he had gone through decades much ptsd. he had a rough war. he had seen many of the own men killed, went through a lot of the patterns that people tend to go through with post-traumatic stress. adrenaline junkie, wrecked cars, he drank alcohol, had a headquartered time forming roits. -- relationships. he got married kind of life, his wife who was an army brat had seen that he was going through the flashbacks and et. cetera, and he remembered that had sent things to his mother. she had put them in the at -- attic. he bloc
, the commander of naval forces in vietnam and the chief naval operations officer from 1970-'74. and we talk about his work for veterans in his retirement. >> that they provided, the pictures, the videos, and then my individual meetings with each of them as i struggled to try to put this story together, so many pieces. and it's not easy for them either, because they didn't know what kind of book i would be writing, you know? and what they might be contributing to. so it's a particular honor for me to have them here today. and also it's a particular honor to have my son here today as well who i just want to say that, you know, when your life is full of these great circles, and it's really great when, you know, your son who lives here in the washington, d.c. and works in treasury can attend one of his father's talks. and i didn't even make him buy the book, which -- [laughter] is the key. i'm particularly proud of scott, and just want to say that. and i look around the room, there are some other good friends including my oldest friend and college roommate, it's just really great just to see so many
in singapore hospital. dozens take to the streets to protest the iraqi government. >> in vietnam, we talk to fishermen about the increasing dangers of working in disputed waters. >> u.s. president barack obama says he still hopes congress can reach agreement to avoid the so- called fiscal cliff. obama met congressional leaders at the white house on friday to discuss a deal. he said the talks were constructive, but did issue a warning on behalf of the american people, demanding congress take action. >> america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you cannot get stuff done in an organized time table, where everything has to wait till the last minute. we are now of the last minute. in the american people are not going to have any patients for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. >> the president said he was modestly optimistic that the january 1 deadline for the fiscal cliff could be averted, but that is contingent on a vote in the senate on a compromise bill, and that will have to get an up or down vote. there is a majority for that, with some tax increases fo
in massachusetts. i want to talk about chuck hegel. this man came back from vietnam with two purple hearts. there is talk about him going to the pentagon but there are some republicans are not very happy with him. why? >> chuck hagel was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix. he said i want to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist, and after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has bled for his country, unlike his critics. he understand war, unlike his critics. he did not have other priorities, like richard cheney, and never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill cohen put it best. he has fought and bled for this country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying
was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist and after two weeks, went to vietnam. he has fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has but pours countries, unlike his critics. he understands war, unlike his critics. he does not have other priorities, as richard cheney did at the same time in vietnam. he never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill, and put it best. he has fought for his country and but for his country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since t
world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of foreign policy magazine and has done tremendous work in the national security discussion. prior to joining foreign policy, susan was a reporter for "the washington post" and for the capitol hill newspaper "roll call." she brings great experience and expertise to this conversation tonight. tom and susan, we're poised for an illuminating conversation about generalship, command and relief. tom and susan, over to you. >> first of all, thank you so much, rich, for that kind introdiscussion and a big -- introduction and a big thank you to cns. thank you very much. and i think you've given us a perfect starting point for the con
, although i do offer courses in premodern asian history, mostly concentrating on thailand and vietnam. >> host: so why is it important? >> guest: the united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the world. we have many allies there, partners we're still working with, and many students at the naval caidmy are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia, and they're going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history, to be comfortable with the cultures and to have some knowledge of their histories. >> host: well, professor ruth, one of our longtime allies is thailand, and you've written a book called "in buddha's company: thai soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did their military play in the vietnam war? >> guest: thailand was actually a very close ally of the united states during the vietnam war. many people who are familiar with the circumstances of the vietnam war will know that not only did thailand send troops to fight alongside the united states and the ot
vietnam, were already over in grease. >> -- over in greece. >> i'm jumping ahead. the british go back the mediterranean get iran back, a conflict in iran in 1945. and beyond that, india is crucial. the jewel of the empire. we show that in the masks, and he gets the far east. its the richest resource in the world. along with britain. not us. and that becomes -- that is a key plot. so, you think from a u.s.-soviet relations. >> three parts cold war in the beginning. most americans have no idea. and had no idea what role the british were playing, but roosevelt did, and roosevelt was very, very critical of the british empire, as was his vice president from '41 to '4 5 henry wallace. the two of of them wanted to dismant el the british empire, the french empire, the portuguese, they were both very anticolonial. truman lets them back in and encourages the emand gives them aid. >> that's an important point. >> and got us involved in vietnam. >> a lot of the turmoil we're going to later face. the other question you're raising, which is an important one, we don't know if -- there would have b
with this man. you call him truly the first great american hero after vietnam. your thoughts? >> that is exactly right, harris. remember, i come from the same generation as general schwarzkopf and the vector was the vindication of my generation report vietnam generation because it was our first great military victory after defeat in vietnam and he took that personally. i knew general schwarzkopf well, going back to his time as a major in the pentagon. he also carried in his sack this rock that had the sigma that went with the defeat in vietnam. when defeated the iraqi military in the plains of iraq, when was able to do that one of the first things he said at the truce tent was this is a vindication for my generation, harris. so detail on his life, general scales, many people may not know. he was born in trenton, new jersey. in fact, his father founded and was heading the new jersey state police force. i mean he had a great background as a child in leadership in his home. >> remember, his dad was the one that led the investigation in the lindbergh son's kidnapping in the 1930s. he was already a n
, the early cold war period in the truman doctrine of 47 to 49. we had american advisers in early vietnam were over in this. the british goal is truly suez, get back the meta-training, get the oil regions and get i ran back, this conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it was india crucial to the empire and we show that in the beautiful maps and beyond that he gets to the far east. is the richest resources in the world that belonged to britain, not us. that becomes -- that's not a subplot. is a key plot so you can't talk about u.s. soviet relations without talking about the british empire. >> guest: three points, the cold war and the beginning and most americans have no idea and have no idea what role the british were playing but roosevelt did and roosevelt was very critical of the british empire as was his vice president from 41 to 45, henry wallace who dismantled the french empire, the portuguese in the dutch. they were very anti-colonial. truman as we know lets them back and then encourages them and gives them aid and support. and then it gets assembled in vietnam. a lot of the turmoil that
. they were tough. you're a vietnam veteran. they had been on the streets for a long time. they're toughening at how to take care of themselves in this their ground. they moved into some of the abandoned houses in areas that fixed amount, close business, car mechanics business, painting business and they became a fixture in this community at a time when other distressed neighborhoods were being bulldozed by the redevelopment agencies in san francisco and that's the great tragedy of courses one striving black neighborhood in san francisco that was once called the harlem of the west, great music coming out to the neighborhood was leveled in the haight could've gone in that direction as well. as of late 60s, our troops are taking neighborhood and it's the good earth commune in part to stand their ground and help me not neighborhood. that's the part of the book i want to share with you right now and then were going to questions and i would love to have some back-and-forth with you all in here from dr. smith in maryland. so this is chapter 17 in my book, love's last stand. the haight was a war zon
world -- world war and the vietnam analogy that argues the limits of power, the arguments that you are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a real
to vietnam but cannot send troops to selma, alabama, to protect people whose only desire is to register to vote." the next thing i knew, i had been admitted to the local hospital in selma. amy goodman: explain that moment where you decided to move forward, because i don't think the history we learn records those small acts that are actually gargantuan acts of bravery. talk about-i mean, you saw the weapons the police arrayed against you. what propelled you forward, congressmember lewis? rep. john lewis: well, my mother, my father, my grandparents, my uncles and aunts, and people all around me had never registered to vote. i had been working all across the south. the state of mississippi had a black voting age population of more than 450,000, and only about 16,000 were registered to vote. on that day, we didn't have a choice. i think we had been tracked down by what i call the spirit of history, and we couldn't-we couldn't turn back. we had to go forward. we became like trees planted by the rivers of water. we were anchored. and i thought we would die. i first thought we would be arreste
and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talking about the british empire. >> here are the three parts of the cold war in the beginning. most americans have no idea. and they have no idea what role the british are playing but roosevelt did, and roosevelt was very, very critical of the british empire has was his vice president from 41 to 45, henry wallace. they want to bring it to the could dismantle the british empire, the french empire, the portuguese, they were very anticolonial. they encourage them and give them a did. it gets us involved in vietnam and in a lot of turmoil that we are going to leave her face. but the other questions you were raising we don't know if
it in vietnam, and we are having difficulty in iraq and afghanistan is proving very difficult. so we concluded, do not get involved in protracted nation building exercises. >> you guys did look at a range of options. give us a sketch on what these options are and what are the major trade-offs. >> first we built a strategy, then we tested the strategy at different budget levels, as you said. one was a budget which would keep up with inflation. one was the president's budget. one was what we call the smooth sequester. we took the sequester cut and reduced it to a 10% cut over 10 years from the president's budget. then we took one which matched previous draw-downs after vietnam and the cold war, which is a 15% cut from the president's budget. and for each of those we said, well, if you are going to reduce, given this strategy, what would you cut, and what would you try to build on? >> what are the most vulnerable capabilities and the systems that ended up getting hit, depending on the budget? >> obviously if you are not going to fight protracted ground wars, you can cut ground forces. we have bui
from vietnam wh two purple hearts, talk about him going to the pentagon. there are some republicans who were not t very happy with hiss formerer republican senator. why? >> chuckck hagel had orders to go to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the wors
the overhead is distributed. >> you worked in the pentagon during the vietnam war and there are those and you even mentioned certain parallels between the vietnam conflict and what we're seeing in afghanistan. right now there's a big debate going on in washington whether or not troop levels should remain high to ensure that we can train the afghans fast enough to hand over control before we leave at the end of 2014. why is that a bad idea from your standpoint? >> the real question is what kind of country is going to -- will it be possible to leave behind? and the case of vietnam, my own conclusion back in period of 1967, '68, became that the government there was unsustainable because it really did not have a loyalty of the people. and that no matter what we tried to do. it would not have lasted for very long time after we left. afghanistan's i think somewhat different. it's not a matter of one piece of it geographically taking over the other piece. et is a matter of a nation -- it is a matter of a nation that's never really been unified at all tightly. but since then it's become clear that it
that was not koud by vietnam and scars of what democrats did in vietnam and then after vietnam and i think a lot of democrats were afraid to go against iraq because of what tarred them with vietnam. we've been timid for decades because of vietnam and with the obama administration you have a group of people who say we don't think about vietnam. we make the decisions we want to make. kerry brings the vietnam psychic scars back into the forefront of democratic foreign policy. i can't even say this is how it will impact that. but just once again vietnam comes back into the democratic psyche when we had gotten i want out. >> steve, i know you have another race you're excited about. >> we talk about these senate 2014. new jersey this week. big news. cory booker, everybody is ambitious or least favorite. he said this week what a shock he's not going run for governor of new jersey in 2013. that would have been a kamikaze mission. he's committed to newark. even though he spenz his time in new york. >> i love cory booker. leave him alone. >> the one republican here loves cory booker. >> so now the big iss
." "almost every soldier in -- almost every general in desert shield served in vietnam. how much did this impact the rest of your career? >> it had more impact than any other experience i had in my entire military career. many of the decisions that i made in desert storm and desert shield or a direct result of things that we have learned from our vietnam experience. maybe not things that have gone well. you learn just as much piscine things done wrong. you say, i never do it that way and then you will do it differently. it has an unbelievable impact. i came back from vietnam the second time and agonized when it to stay in the military or not. the only way i came to an answer to myself was yes, i would stay but only under the circumstances and doing it this way. all of that was directly as a result from vietnam. a profound influence. >> you were there twice, once as an adviser to the south vietnam and then in 69. >> i spent five miserable months at headquarters and then from there to seven months as a telling commander. >> go back to your first trip there, 1964, 65. how did to get the
at the vietnam veterans memorial wall. a christmas tree was placed at the wall of volunteers decorated it with greeting cards and ornaments which were and made by school children from across the country. organizers say this is the way to honor veterans and those of who are currently serving and their families at the holidays. this is the 16th year the vietnam veterans war memorial has placed a tree at the wall. >> coming up next, if you are one of those shoppers like to wait until the last minute, we will find out >> if you have not melder holiday gifts to friends and family, don't worry today is free shipping day. more than 1600 retailers are offering free shipping deals with guaranteed delivery by christmas eve. some sites will make you spend a minimum so check free shippingday.com. they say nearly $34 billion has been spent on line and that is a record. >> turning to move the news, moviegoers help to break a box office or reichert --"the hobbit" took in nearly $85 million in three days which is the biggest december box office opening ever. it has a worldwide total gross of $203 mill
commander in the vietnam war. he had contacted me a number of years ago because i have some context and yet, vietnamese they've been working with. he had been taking the contents of the body of a north vietnamese soldier yet killed during the word and wanted to see if he could find the family to return the to them. he'd gone through decades of ptsd, not only because he killed that man. he had a rapport. he'd seen many of his own men killed. went through a lot of the patterns that people tend to go through with posttraumatic stress. and a traveling junkie, he wrecked cars, drink alcohol, had a hard time forming relationships. he got married late in his wife was in on the craters of had seen he was going through these flashbacks, et cetera and he remembered that he had sent to his mother and she put them in her attic. gila's book out of his mind for 40 years. his mother had his letters, but she also taken a diary he had sent and put it in her attic. said he was looking through the letters at the suggestion of his wife and from the book again and brought it all back to him. at that point, he t
presidential run of lying about his military record in vietnam. >> john kerry has not been honest about what happened in vietnam. >> reporter: and criticized for his 1971 testimony opposing vietnam war. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >>> kerry was painted a flip-flopper and out of touch, and unable to grasp struggles of regular americans and kerry did put president obama, then an unknown politician on the national stage at the democratic convention. >> john kerry believes that in a dangerous world war must be an option sometimes, but it should never be the first option. >> reporter: following the loss, kerry immersed himself in foreign policy. >> we stand adjourned. >> reporter: now the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, he's been an unofficial envoy for president obama, helping ease tension with president karzai in afghanistan and helping mend strained relations with pakistan after the killing of osama bin laden. >> we are strategic partners with a common enemy in terrorism and extremism. >> reporter: but kerrie is not totally in sync with oba
a little-known u.s. army general. a west point graduate and officer for his vietnam, he spent his in the army. >> let me put it this way, it take as long as it takes. >> as the leader of the u.s.-led coalition,al schwarzkopf achieved a rock star status. returned to the persian gulf his wasonal hero and the medal of freedom. >> he was a leader, a motivator. >> he was an extremely compassionate man. >> after retirement, he declined by both parties to run for political office. president george h. w. bush issued a statement. >> general schwarzkopf never interest inrue office.for he often played down the label of hero. years, he seemed most proud of this work with children's charities. >> we will take you quickly to landover right now. shanahan is speaking. show us what he could do. i thought he stepped up and played at an exceptional level. wilson? you talk about all the pressure you unleashed romo. >> we had some outside blitz's and some inside the .... zes.lit you have to get to good timing. maybe we got him to throw a than heit earlier wanted to. >> the offense has grown. sometimes
. your story telling is not dense. you talked about this project about the vietnam war or world war ii or the civil war, it's the voices, it's waking the dead, as you have said. what is that about? >> what it is about is what you do, too. it is listening. we don't do very much listening in our world. we do a lot of telling. and if you listen you learn unbelievable amoupts of things. so what if you listened to a still photograph? what if you said that still photograph is not some arrested static moment but a representation of some place, some moment in time that had a past and will have a future? and what if you moved in it the way your eye would move in it if you were living in it, the way you might walk through it if you were living in it? what if you listen to it? is that cart wheel turning or canon firing or the crowds cheering? what are the things that would will that inanimate moment alive again trusting in its secret that it is some portal to that time? that is part of waking the dead. what if you didn't impose the third person narrator but allowed first person voices of the way
and not even going home, because i was to get data to vietnam during the siege of -- our ability to supply equipment without landing, i worked so hard on that because our troops were in trouble. that is just one example and kind of the whole career was like that. i did not realize i was tired until i retired. i was not driving, my wife drove, and i just relax. and i said, you know, i really am tired. and i didn't do anything in engineering or airplane design for more than a year. cold turkey. and then i had this idea for a new plane. >> i have a quick question regarding the most recent jump by felix baumgartner. how the ec that driving the privatized space industry and influencing kids that want to get into the industry? >> what was it -- how do you see that driving the privatized space industry? >> it was done many years before. what baumgartner did was a milestone only because he went high enough so that he actually fell at supersonic speed. he broke the sound barrier with his body. other than that, he was just doing a jump 20% higher than the last jump. so he did a milestone, and histor
of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he
's just say vietnam or malaysia, and then to get it at a price point that was reasonable, you would have to sell tens of thousand thousands of them. but now you can send this to the other side of the world and they can print out the exact same object. >> it's the exact same object. just like we send a file or document around the world, we can do that with physical objects. there has been a bunch of interesting experiments with this, ideas like not just how it's made but where if can be made. a colleague of mine just did it in a simulation of space with the idea of instead of bringing the complete inventory of parch you would need in a space station. take a 3-d printer and print what you need. if you're in a remote village of africa take a 3-d printer and you can print what you need. >> i would imagine something huge you would need something more than a small box, you would have robotic arms that go on and on and on? i read that down at usc they're printing a building. >> yes, there is a guy down at usc, a professor who printed a building. enormous robotic structure computer controlled, h
are made in vietnam or china. >> reporter: the u.s. commerce department says vietnam and china have flooded the market, forcing nearly all u.s. manufacturers out of business. so the feds slapped a 187% tariff on the imported hangers, more than doubling the cost to dry cleaners. >> we were paying probably 4 to 5 cents a hanger, now we're paying upwards of 10 cents a hanger. >> reporter: janice says customers noticed the price increase. >> customers never like it. but as costs go up for supplies, we have to do it. >> reporter: janice says hangers are hardly worth harping about. the real costs are from utilities, chemicals and wages. well, when you run through nearly 10,000 hangers a month, every cent counts, and recycling is highly encouraged. she says if you have hangers hanging around the house, hand them back in. that's fewer foreign hangers that have to be purchased. in albany, don ford, cbs 5. >>> welcome to the wettest month of the year. that was held by march for much of the year, but we eclipsed that yesterday. here's a peek ou,,,,,,,,,,,,,, midwest shows no signs of backing down. th
look, from world war ii to vietnam, the men who put themselves on harm's way to give the troops a little bit of home while away. bob hope. >> and -- >>> tonight we take a second look at troops serving during the holidays. bob hope visited the troops in 2003. we remember bob hope's entertaining the troops. >> reporter: it's hard to believe bob hope was nearly 73 years old when he first entertained the troops in 2003. >> we present the bob hope show. >> thank you, how do you do ladies and gentlemen. this is bob mosquito network hope. >> reporter: and nearly 90 when he entertained troops in the first gulf war. it was his passion. >> it's a thrill to be here in korea. nice to be here at oncave. very happy to be back here. >> happy to be here, i don't know where we are but i'm happy. >> working for the troops is an outstanding thing. i think so because you traveled all over the world doing that. >> an exciting year, the only christmas present my mother wants is to receive a note from you saying you had seen our show. do you want to save the stamp, go ahead write a letter to mother.
're going down on a small track. this is from a popular tourist attraction in vietnam and looks like a blast, until this happens. >> they fell off the track. >> the guy that we're riding with had his camera going and he sees a car up ahead of him. he slows down. the person behind them in their personal roller coaster car doesn't slow down enough and drills into the back of him. that sends that guy off into the weeds. apparently there are sensors on the track supposed to trigger the brakes automatically in certain parts of the track. either those brakes didn't work or the sensor failed. either way not a fun day at the park. >> if you give somebody any kind of control on this kind of ride, this kind of thing is going to happen. >> you can't! or at least tell them not to eat the hamburger before they go on the ride, you know. don't eat the burrito. >> the all you can eat vietnam buffet. >> do it after the ride. . >>> i want you guys to meet charlie. he is an american staffordshire terrier. this is in san francisco. that is where charlie lives. charlie is in danger of losing his family and his l
in vietnam.and returned home. his cousin did not. it really tore me up because i was looking forward to being with him, it took 30 yrs for me to come to the wall tt see his name..." linny is still haunted by the iiaggs he saw ii 1967.... (((voice only: linny))):11--:22 that was very scarry and to see the actual napalm falling and hitting jungle to get the vietcong a 19 year old."as tourists pass by... linny wonders how ome hh didn't end up with pis name etched on this gganite. liie 58 housand.... other.... soldiers. "this is the wall where linzas name appears... and this is linzas right here...(points) man wow... my man... 30 years... sniffle.. rubs eye... linzie died young,... "20... yep that was my buddy.... sigh.... 30 years...." it haa been too years...."buddy.... sigh.... 30 years...."" itthad been too painful or linny to make this trip before..."he gave the ultimate.." but now.. llnny facee an illness that could very well end hii own life... ""ou say he was there before you got there.. yeah a couple of months before me and he was we could hook up in t there so saig
mission is. >> the iraq war cost more than the war in vietnam, for example, and we spend trillions of dollars once all the, the needs of veterans and service members, over two million who were deployed to iraq and afghanistan since 9/11, are met in perpetuity and their families. and so, so it's an incredibly costly thing. >> and a major milestone for the u.s. effort in afghanistan, the war is now entering its twelfth year, making it the longest running war in our nation's history. >> now as the wars in iraq and afghanistan come to a close, a frail economic climate at home has left many americans wanting to keep the troops home for good. >> the pentagon came out with new defense guidance in january 2012, which reflected the obama administration's understanding that budgets were going to be constrained first. and that second, the united states would not be likely to fight anymore wars like iraq or afghanistan in the near future, or the next decade or so. >> the point is that the american appetite for global intervention is going to decrease. there aren't many americans that want to k
different from when i first entered government and in the years after vietnam. there are so many companies now that have special programs to try and train veterans that give them really good jobs and so many communities have organized so many things to help wounded warriors and to help them reintegrate, one of the things that is really, really made me feel good is the number of universities around the country that have put together veterans programs in their university to help the veterans, a place where they can get together and a place where they can get counseling and advice and financial assistance and so on, it is all -- i think everybody is trying to do the right thing. yet in some ways there is never enough. there is a lot of them, you know, there have been maybe a million and a half, 2 million people serve over the last ten years, so it is a big challenge, but i think people's hearts in the right place. >> rose: i do too and i think there has been a real celebration since vietnam when they came back from the wars since then. >> and the interesting thing, charlie is kind, there kind
the aftermath of the vietnam war because of the, you know, political unpopularity of the war that this was considered a seriou diagnostatery. in 1980 the american psychiatric association officially designated it that. but in the early days, because the evidence of post traumatic stress disorder comes from an individual report, people were skeptical about the reliability of its, thought this was a way of soldiers found to avoid going back to the front. they called this bad behavior and as "the new york times", which by the way seems to be calling our programs each time, last time they did pain, now they are dos post traumatic stress disorder, they must be watching what is happening on charlie rose. >> re: they could do worse. >> they could do a lot worse. (laughter) >> so they pointed out that veterans from the vietnam war suffer a double hurt. first of all they have the disease, the post traumatic stress disorder but in addition because many of them were thought to be malingerers, bad behavior they did not get an honorable discharge. this is no longer the case. this is now co
jersey, schwarzkopf graduated from west point in 1956. he served two tours in vietnam, earning three silver stars for valor-- one for saving troops from a minefield. he also earned a purple heart and a raft of other medals. schwarzkopf stuck it out in the army through the lean, post- vietnam years, rising through the ranks. in 1988, he took over the u.s. central command responsible for the middle east. so it fell to him to command "operation desert storm" which opened in january 1991 with six weeks of allied bombings against the iraqi army. a few weeks into the air campaign, he spoke to "newshour" correspondent charlayne hunter- gault from his headquarters in riyadh, saudi arabia. >> saddam hussein is not a military man. he thought of this war in tactical terms, okay, at the lowest level. he never thought of it in strategic terms and what is happening all of a sudden he is finding that he taking a terrible licking strategically and he has no capability to react to that. i don't think we are close to breaking saddam's will. i don't think that is breakable. but i certainly we have the
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